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build my own or a liso

I'm new on forums so i hope i post this in the correct place.

Are there any persons who have experience  or performance information about this boat?? stability speed...

I'm not certain  what to do: build my own boat or buy this liso boat. I'm new in the wooden boat stuff and i'm searching for advice.On google i find several websites selling it but no information except from that eyn seller. The only thing i find is on the brand page http://lisoboats.eu itself.

But as told, i'm new and those figures don't tell me much. So, is there someone who can tell me more about it Embarassed Or can some check that boat info and tell me more please. I intend to use it with my family, so me, my wife and our daughter.

Also other ideas about other good boats or designs are very welcome!Laughing

16 foot - Table for 4 - from Canadian Electric

CANADIAN ELECTRIC- 16 foot - Table for 4

Single lever - EZ Stearing

Minn Kota Electric Motor

Variable Speed Control

6-8 hours of water time on full charge

Bilge Pump

Pioneer Sound System

Bow and Stern Flags 

Karavan Custom Trailer

Designing and building something a little different

Well I'm new here and I did build a "6 hour canoe" that I figured out several years ago, but it's become damaged to the point of not being worth rebuilding, so I decided to design and build something a little different. It's an S&G design "canyak', for lack of a better word. The pirogue served it's purpose and I enjoyed building as well as using it, but it had a learning curve when it came to using it. After looking ad quite a few other designs out by different designers, I decided what I'm looking for.

 

Flexible vs Rigid Adhesive for Door Construction

Friends:

I am making a one-for-one replacement companionway door for my daughter and son-in-law's motor cruiser.  The existing door is made of teak and features stainless steel hardware.  Image 49 shows the existing door in its closed position.  Image 50 shows the door in its open position.  Image 54 shows the basic construction, rails and stiles joined by tenons with the panels fitted into rabbets in the frame pieces.  Images 52 and 56 show the dilapidated state of the door.

I am planning to make new rails and stiles from teak and to reuse the panels from the existing door.  The panels are in reasonable shape and can be restored by sanding and scraping.  I am planning to reuse as much of the hardware as I can, probably only having to replace the fasteners.  The owners requested that I keep the folding door design rather than make a rigid one-piece replacement door.

Flexible vs Rigid Adhesive for Door Construction

Friends:

I am making a one-for-one replacement companionway door for my daughter and son-in-law's motor cruiser.  The existing door is made of teak and features stainless steel hardware.  Image 49 shows the existing door in its closed position.  Image 50 shows the door in its open position.  Image 54 shows the basic construction, rails and stiles joined by tenons with the panels fitted into rabbets in the frame pieces.  Images 52 and 56 show the dilapidated state of the door.

I am planning to make new rails and stiles from teak and to reuse the panels from the existing door.  The panels are in reasonable shape and can be restored by sanding and scraping.  I am planning to reuse as much of the hardware as I can, probably only having to replace the fasteners.  The owners requested that I keep the folding door design rather than make a rigid one-piece replacement door.

Shop cats and epoxy

Pete the Cat under boatTransom on, bottom braced, I attached the frames and the stem.  With the frames in place, it's easy to see where the bottom bevel needs to end up, and I could see that I'd been pretty generous when I cut the bottom out.  I left plenty of stock to trim away, and it looked like I'd be planing forever, but it turned out to be less of a job than I feared.  I stropped my plane, put some music on, and planed happily away; got a little carried away, evidently, because when I checked the bevel at the fourth frame, I found I had gone too far.  The first stumble is painful, but plywood garboards will bend enough to compensate for the dip in the bottom bevel, and I'll just have to hope that people are too polite to stare at my bottom and snigger.

Marsude on the slip ... still

Marsude has been on the slip for ten days now and in that time we have removed 40 years of antifoul, removed rusting steel frame supports  in the bilge and replaced them with stainless steel ... no idea why they put steel in a timber boat in the first place ... the cedar stringers and hull are fine, however the frames are rotten where they have been in contact with the rusting steel and screwed through laminated joints ...  

We have also removed all the through hull fittings to repair or replace with new bronze ones  ... The mast is down and the boom and whisker pole and spreaders are at home in the back yard waiting for sanding to be completed. 

Moving Outside

transomWith the floor planed and its bevel roughed out, I'm ready to move the boat parts to the carport and begin setting up to hang the planks.  I made a pair of sturdy sawhorses out of two by fours, and when I had the bottom laying across them, I saw right away that they were too short for the stem.  How did I possibly fail to account for the length of the stem when I was making sawhorses for this very specific purpose?  I've found that when I build and fabricate, the most frequent challenge is correcting after the fact for one important point or other that I missed in the planning stage.

Lines and Patterns

plottingThis is the half breadths of the body plan; the vertical line in the center is the stem of the boat, and each of the lines next to it are the profiles of the frames, or ribs of the boat, which double as the molds that the planks will be bent around.  I laid these out on half a sheet of masonite with a colored pencil, plotting points from the table of offsets.  These are the lines that I'll use to make the patterns for the frames and transom, and it looks to me like I won't know whether I hosed the job up or not until I'm putting the planks on the boat, which will be much too late. 

Once the lines were down, I laid the masonite on the floor and for each station, put nails on their sides at each plotted point, and then laid a piece of pattern stock on top of it and stepped on it, transferring the points to the pattern stock. 

What got me started

About a year ago, my girlfriend gave me a book entitled Wooden Boats by Michael Ruhlman (Penguin Books, 2001).  It was written about a boat yard on Martha's Vineyard that builds plank on frame wooden boats using traditional methods and materials.  That book completely captured my imagination.  It's not a how-to, but is mainly about the romance and beauty of wooden boats and the builders' reasons for choosing to build a type of boat that has long been almost completely replaced by fiberglass, aluminum, and modern manufacturing. 

Best Marine Epoxy

My favorite epoxy?

 

EpoxyUSA.com Progressive Basic No-Blush Epoxy

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